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African-American women candidates in Georgia make history

Robbin Shipp, Democratic candidate for labor commissioner speaks at a press conference Wednesday. Pictured left to right Helen Butler, Rep. Dar'shun Kendrick, D-Lithonia, Rep. Sandra Scott, D-Rex, Secretary of State Doreen Carter and Rep. Dee Dawkins-Haigler, D-Lithonia.  MORRIS NEWS SERVICE/Erica Techo

ATLANTA ‑ Several black women, including elected officials and community leaders, gathered Wednesday to discuss how Georgia will make history in November.

For the first time in the state and nation, five African-American women will be on a statewide ballot.

These candidates include Doreen Carter for secretary of state, Liz Johnson for insurance commissioner, Robbin Shipp for labor commissioner, Connie Stokes for lieutenant governor and Valarie Wilson for school superintendent.

Wilson won the Democratic nomination in a Tuesday runoff against another black woman, Rep. Alisha Thomas Morgan of Austell.

“Never before in the history of Georgia or the nation has there been five African-American women on a ballot statewide,” said Rep. Dee Dawkins-Haigler, D-Lithonia. “So, we did not want to miss the opportunity to get out and announce this to everyone in the state of Georgia and tell everyone how important this election will be in November.”

Shipp said it was a happy accident that all five women ended up running together.

“I didn’t know when I qualified on March 7 that I was going to be making history. I was just trying to serve,” she said. “So joining these ladies, joining this slate from the top of the ticket to the bottom, I believe that we are presenting to the state of Georgia an opportunity to elect individuals who genuinely care about families, who genuinely care about our children.”

To rally votes, the candidates and a group of elected officials will go on a bus tour beginning in August. The bus tour will start in Metro Atlanta and travel to cities with a majority of registered black women voters.

“What you find (with bus tours like this) is women are just energized,” said Helen Butler, executive director for the Georgia Coalition for the People’s Agenda. “They understand that collectively they have the power.”

Rainbow PUSH Vice President and Executive Director Janice Mathis said their efforts show the dedication African-American women have toward important issues.

“It is a historic occasion, and it is so consistent with the way African-American women treat their institutions,” she said. “Whether it’s our churches or families or sororities, you won’t find women more devoted to causes than African-American women.”

Who says good girls aren’t fun? #SundayFunday #BaeHome #NationalIceCreamDay #Hermanas #CarefreeBlackGirls #OnePercent

Who says good girls aren’t fun? #SundayFunday #BaeHome #NationalIceCreamDay #Hermanas #CarefreeBlackGirls #OnePercent

Anonymous asked: Hello I like your blog :) Keep up the good work and stay cute

Hi! I’ve been reluctant to open my questions these days but you just made it worth it! Thank you for your encouragement  you stay kind!!

- Unapproachable Black Chick


A couple of times during “Sincerely, Me,” an ambitious production presented by ArtsCentric, the audience is asked to imagine how poorer our world would be without the legacy of African American women who raised their voices in song.


ArtsCentric celebrates African-American female vocal artists in ‘Sincerely, Me’ - Tim Smith 
Baltimore Sun

A couple of times during “Sincerely, Me,” an ambitious production presented by ArtsCentric, the audience is asked to imagine how poorer our world would be without the legacy of African American women who raised their voices in song.

ArtsCentric celebrates African-American female vocal artists in ‘Sincerely, Me’ - Tim Smith 

Baltimore Sun

(Source: articles.baltimoresun.com)

“I think what you’re trying to ask is why am I so insistent upon… giving out to them that BLACK-ness, that BLACK-power, that BLACK pushing them to identify with black culture; I think that’s what you’re asking. I have no choice over it; in the first place, to me we are the most beautiful creatures in the whole world, black people. And I mean that in every sense, outside and inside. And to me we have a culture that is surpassed by no other civilization but we don’t know anything about it. So again, I think I’ve said this before in this same interview, I think at some time before. My job is to somehow make them curious enough or persuade them, by hook or crook, to get more aware of themselves and where they came from and what they are into and what is already there, and just to bring it out. This is what compels me to compel them and I will do it by whatever means necessary.”

-Nina Simone

My philosophy, thanks Nina.

(Source: wisdomftf.com)

WNBA All Star Dunk Fest

Yes.

Y’all really got the Black girl reading banned books mugshot from a year ago at 57,000 notes though? Why are yall so amazing?


On Gender Norms and Young Black Girls
JULY 7, 2014BYCIARA MYERS, EDITOR 1 COMMENT
By Riki WilchinsTrueChildhttp://www.truechild.org
Riki Wilchins is the Executive Director at TrueChild, an organization that aids donors, policy-makers and practitioners in reconnecting race, class and gender through “gender transformative” approaches challenging rigid gender norms and inequities. Wilchins has authored three books on gender theory and has appeared in a number of anthologies and publications on the subject. Her work has led her to be profiled by The New York Times, and she was once selected as one of Time Magazine’s “100 Civic Innovators for the 21st Century.” Here, Wilchins discusses what we can do to correct the effects of gender norms on young, black girls.
Decades of researchhas found that challenging harmful gender norms are a key to improving life outcomes for at-risk communities.
For instance, young women who internalize narrow feminine ideals that prioritize motherhood, dependence, vulnerability and appearance have lower life outcomes in reproductive health, education and economic empowerment.
Major international donor agencies like PEPFAR, USAID, UNAIDs, and WHO have all implemented “gender transformative” initiatives that challenge traditional gender norms, and found them effective (an introductory paper is here).
Gender impacts every issue funders address; yet donors and grantees are seldom challenged to do innovative work around gender.
As a senior program officer put it, “My staff and grantees get race and class, but where’s the gender analysis? What I want to know is—what happened to gender?”
Part of the answer to her question may lie in new report onyoung Black girlswe conducted for the Heinz Endowments.
We found that Black adolescent girls and young women face special barriers related to both race and gender which have immense effects on their health, achievement and life outcomes. And this was especially true for low-income Black girls, who also have challenges associated with poverty.
First, Black girls’ unique race and gendered experiences of discrimination result in multiple stresses that – over time – impair their immune systems.
Also, they must navigate social hostilities based on race as well as pressures to conform to traditional feminine ideals and those specific to Black communities.
Moreover, feminine norms in the Black community often prioritize caretaking and self-sacrifice. Black girls may be silently encouraged to focus on others’ health while ignoring signals of pain and illness until their own bodies are in crisis.
The additive impact of these stresses can produce a “weathering effect,” in which Black women’s bodies become physically and biologically vulnerable, resulting in high rates of chronic disorders, reproductive health problems, infant mortality and obesity.




Download the report here

On Gender Norms and Young Black Girls


By Riki Wilchins
TrueChild
http://www.truechild.org

Riki Wilchins is the Executive Director at TrueChild, an organization that aids donors, policy-makers and practitioners in reconnecting race, class and gender through “gender transformative” approaches challenging rigid gender norms and inequities. Wilchins has authored three books on gender theory and has appeared in a number of anthologies and publications on the subject. Her work has led her to be profiled by The New York Times, and she was once selected as one of Time Magazine’s “100 Civic Innovators for the 21st Century.” Here, Wilchins discusses what we can do to correct the effects of gender norms on young, black girls.


Decades of researchhas found that challenging harmful gender norms are a key to improving life outcomes for at-risk communities.

For instance, young women who internalize narrow feminine ideals that prioritize motherhood, dependence, vulnerability and appearance have lower life outcomes in reproductive health, education and economic empowerment.

Major international donor agencies like PEPFAR, USAID, UNAIDs, and WHO have all implemented “gender transformative” initiatives that challenge traditional gender norms, and found them effective (an introductory paper is here).

Gender impacts every issue funders address; yet donors and grantees are seldom challenged to do innovative work around gender.

As a senior program officer put it, “My staff and grantees get race and class, but where’s the gender analysis? What I want to know is—what happened to gender?”

Part of the answer to her question may lie in new report onyoung Black girlswe conducted for the Heinz Endowments.

We found that Black adolescent girls and young women face special barriers related to both race and gender which have immense effects on their health, achievement and life outcomes. And this was especially true for low-income Black girls, who also have challenges associated with poverty.

First, Black girls’ unique race and gendered experiences of discrimination result in multiple stresses that – over time – impair their immune systems.

Also, they must navigate social hostilities based on race as well as pressures to conform to traditional feminine ideals and those specific to Black communities.

Moreover, feminine norms in the Black community often prioritize caretaking and self-sacrifice. Black girls may be silently encouraged to focus on others’ health while ignoring signals of pain and illness until their own bodies are in crisis.

The additive impact of these stresses can produce a “weathering effect,” in which Black women’s bodies become physically and biologically vulnerable, resulting in high rates of chronic disorders, reproductive health problems, infant mortality and obesity.

Download the report here

Anonymous asked: Shut the fuck up. People like you are the reason the world can't go forward. You're terrible for the black community.

I know you are but what am I?

#YouOKSis?: Ending Street Harassment