My tribute to black women who should apparently " smile more ..."








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"In this world in which we all feel we’re so full of gender equality and we’re a post-racial [society] and Obama is president, it’s a very good reminder to see the casual racial bias and odd misogyny from a woman written in a paper that we all think of as being so liberal,” the showrunner said of Stanley’s piece.

Shonda Rhimes

Shonda Rhimes response to  New York Times critic Alessandra Stanley 

(Source: US Weekly)

Mother of 3 Killed in Detroit After Rejecting a Man’s Advances

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Mary “Unique” Spears died after the man shot her three times. He also fired into the crowd, injuring five other people. 

An unidentified man is behind bars and is expected to be arraigned on murder charges after killing a Detroit mother and injuring five members of the same family early Saturday morning, WJBK reports.

Mary “Unique” Spears had reportedly just left a relative’s funeral and arrived at the Joe Louis Post rental hall on Detroit’s east side to continue celebrating his life with other family members. That was when Spears was stopped and harassed by a 38-year-old male, whom family members had never seen before.

“He said, ‘Can I get your name, your number?’” one of Spears relatives, who asked to remain unidentified, told the news station. “She said, ‘I have a man; I can’t talk to you.’”

According to the family member, the man continued to bother the 27-year-old mother of three until she was preparing to leave the establishment, when the man reportedly grabbed and hit the woman. Spears’ fiance intervened and a fight ensued, during which the suspect pulled out a gun and started shooting.

“He shot her one time,” the relative told WJBK. “And she tried to run. And he shot her two more times in her head.”

The man then shot into the crowd, injuring Spears’ fiance and four other members of the grief-stricken family.

“I’m scared to walk outside just because of that, and I’m scared that if I reject guys, he gonna shoot me now,” the relative told the station.

“What was on your mind that you could be so evil to kill a beautiful woman because she said no to you?” Spears’ aunt, Belinda Baily, asked.

This is why ‪#‎YOUOKSis‬ is so important. This is a horrendous example of why we must end microaggressions like street harassment because they have the potential to evolve into lethal violence. My heart goes out to this young woman and the loved ones impacted by her murder. 

…

Meet Daniel Holtzclaw, the Oklahoma City Police Offer accused of sexually assaulting at least eight Black women while on duty … and the first white dude to be plastered on Unapproachable Black Chicks.  #BlackWomenMatter

Update at 12:46 : @muninandhugin Brought to my attention that the Officer is white, which explains my confusion about the racial classification on his booking sheet. I also saw that  tashabilities mentioned this as well, which brings up similar questions about whiteness that were posed during the Zimmerman trial. Nonetheless, I stand with the women who have bravely come forward, and challenge Black men to join the conversation about valuing the lives of Black women.

Meet Daniel Holtzclaw, the Oklahoma City Police Offer accused of sexually assaulting at least eight Black women while on duty … and the first white dude to be plastered on Unapproachable Black Chicks.  #BlackWomenMatter

Update at 12:46 : @muninandhugin Brought to my attention that the Officer is white, which explains my confusion about the racial classification on his booking sheet. I also saw that  tashabilities mentioned this as well, which brings up similar questions about whiteness that were posed during the Zimmerman trial. Nonetheless, I stand with the women who have bravely come forward, and challenge Black men to join the conversation about valuing the lives of Black women.

(Source: forharriet.com)

newmodelminority:

nihileigh:

When we live in a world where you can access free content of naked consenting women in less than 5 seconds, why are people still invading the privacy of non-consenting women for nudes?

Hint: It has something to do with people feeling entitled to making any woman their personal porn, even if it violates or humiliates her in the process.

Actually. It is an act of POWER.

(via newsouthnegress)

I would imagine that most adults with any level of social awareness have complicated feelings about a lot of what passes as rap music these days. I just find it unfortunate that so many of us have the courage to speak out against Nicki Minaj having the agency to enjoy her body, but go radio silent when it comes to musicians who speak about violating the bodies of others (be it via rape or other forms of physical violence). Jay Z, who has been out of the drug game longer than he was in it, still wants you to know how many keys he flipped and that he’s still got his Blue Yankees fitted and boys who will end your life if you test him. WHERE IS HIS LETTER, BRUH?
Nicki Minaj should be able to show her grown Black a** when and wherever she wants—-for her own pleasure and/or for the entertainment of fellow adults. It isn’t her responsibility to cover up to save the children, though I do think she should also be clear on when she’s performing for kids and when she’s speaking to an older crowd. Ultimately, the onus of raising our kids will fall on us parents and there is virtually nothing we can do to keep them from listing to Nicki, or Wayne or watching porn, or SnapChatting when not in our presence. But what we CAN do is engage them in meaningful conversations about their bodies (and the bodies of pop stars), their behavior and their choices.
I am not of the school of thought that thinks the worst thing a woman can do is show her a**. That Chris Rock bit about the parent’s greatest responsibility being ‘keeping her off the pole’ is funny, but I’d rather raise a happy, self-possessed young lady who shows her body to the masses, than one who kowtows to a set of respectability politics that serves to do little but dictate that her sexuality is to be policed by someone else (and is primarily a tool of male pleasure.) The unchecked patriarchy of the rap world is far more dangerous to Creekmur’s daughter and mine than Nicki Minaj’s behind. I look forward to the open letters that take that on.

— Jamilah Lemieux is EBONY.com’s Senior Editor

(Source: http)

Women of color have a long history of making a way out of no way, of rising out of circumstances many would consider impossible, of finding hope and purpose in the most difficult circumstances. Surely these are strengths that should be brought to bear on these issues, and surely there is a way for white women to join us in this struggle. There is a saying that is popular on some college campuses right now: Check your privilege. As I understand it, it’s mainly aimed at advantaged white people who are being admonished to recognize their advantages, especially ones they take for granted. I won’t presume to speak for all women of color so I will speak for myself: I don’t care about that. I don’t want your pity, and I can’t use your guilt. I don’t want my white female colleagues to “check” their privilege. I want them to use it—their networks, their assets, their relationships—to form a united front with women of color, and to help improve things for all of us.

WHAT I’VE LEFT UNSAID

On balancing career and family as a woman of color.

Michel Martin is the host of NPR’s Tell Me More. When her show ends in August, she will remain with NPR. Follow her at @NPRMichel.

(Source: nationaljournal.com)

Women On Black Wall Street [North Carolina]

Women on Black Wall Street: Photo Gallery

(Women on Black Wall Street Exhibit Home) 

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This photograph, of female clerical workers, was taken in the old home office on Parrish street.
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The North Carolina Mutual Quintet, Led by Bessie Whitted, last on the right.
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This is Carmen Enza Saunders, the first person at the company to sell over one million dollars worth of insurance. 
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Here, Robert Kenneddy Congratulates Ms. Saunders on her outstanding accomplishment.
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Viola Turner is presented with a corsage by Ms. Della Williams.
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Viola Turner, Elna Spaulding and Carmen Saunders at one of the company’s celebrated banquets.
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Viola Turner, the first female on the board of directors, sits with them for a picture.
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The women at North Carolina Mutual gather for a picture during a social event.
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This 1955 photo shows a woman using the technology that the home office was then famous for having.
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An office at North Carolina Mutual, probably during the 1930s.
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Female workers during the later half of the 1900s, probably between 1960 and 1980.
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A secretarial bay around the same time.

For many years, Durham NC was known as the Capitol of the Black Middle Class because of its vibrant African-American community. The heart of this community was a neighborhood called Hayti anchored by what is now North Carolina Central University at one end, and a street of thriving black-owned financial business at the other.

This street, downtown Durham’s Parrish Street, known as Black Wall Street from about 1910 until 1970, was famous throughout the country because of the successfull black-owned financial businesses, like Mechanics and Farmer’s Bank and the North Carolina Mutual Life Insurance Company, that were founded there. These businesses were unique in their success, and in the opportunities they provided for intelligent African American men and women to succeed in the world of business, a field traditionally dominated by white men.

Today, few people know about the Parrish Street’s rich history, and even fewer know about the women who shaped it’s legacy. These women, who were often an overlooked part of the community, did more than keep house and type dictation. In several cases, they were the leaders who kept these businesses running smoothly and successfully!

Source : Paulimurrayproject.org

Chattanooga Police Captain Makes History
Wednesday, the Chattanooga Police Department announced its top picks for new leadership. One of the 15 individuals promoted within the department made history. Lieutenant Corliss Cooper is now the first African-American Female Captain in the history of the Chattanooga Police Department.

27-year police veteran Corliss Cooper is woman leading that trail blazing. From Patrol to Captain, Cooper’s journey from being recognized as a minority to a leader has been anything but smooth. “Women just… they didn’t pay us any attention. Like yeah you work here, but you can’t hold your own,” says Cooper.

Cooper says that there were plenty of qualified black women that could have held the position of captain. But, 162 years passed without any of them ever been promoted into that role. “There were a many of years where I was down just thinking. Wow, I’m never going to get it because I didn’t play the role. I was always true to myself.”

But even with the doubt, Corliss’s late father proved to be enough inspiration to continue her career. It was his legacy that weighed the heaviest on her heart. “My family was there to see it. Sorry I’m just thinking about my dad. I just wish that my dad could have been there because that’s how I got started. He gave me the application.”

An application that ultimately shattered a 162-year-old glass-ceiling.’We asked Corliss what’s next for her career and she tells us—retirement in two years.

#YouOKSis?: Ending Street Harassment